Saturday, May 4, 2013

18 Beautifully Bizarre Works of Nature



Our Planet is fantastic with stunning, beautifully and even bizarre places to visit and travel to. Here are 18 places that should be on your bucketlist. Enjoy..
planetfantastic01 640x425 18 Beautifully Bizarre Places you should seeThe Wave: (Utah, USA) Carved rock eroded into a wave-like formation made of jurrasic-age Navajo sandstone that is approximately 190 million years old.
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Door to Hell: In Turkmenistan an eternal fire is coming from a massive crater, created by accident after a drilling incident in a Gas mine.
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Rainforest sinkhole: (Jaua-Sarisarinama National Park, Venezuela) A sinkhole is the natural depression of or hole in the Earth’s surface.
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The Puente del Inca: (Argentina) A natural rock bridge covered by bright orange and yellow bacteria mats created by natural sulphur springs which cover the rock walls
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Bryce Amphitheatre: (Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, USA) The bizarre pinnacles of limestone rock and eroding fins create a majestic display
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Tufa Pinnacles: (Mono Lake, Sierra Nevada, USA) Mono Lake is a closed hydrological basin meaning water flows into it but it doesn’t flow out. The only way for water to leave is through evaporation
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The Champagne Pool: (Waiotapu Geothermal area of New Zealand) A colourful hot spring with a surface temperature of 74 degrees celsius. It bubbles due to uprising carbon dioxide
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Tsingy: (Ankarana National Park, Northern Madagascar) A series of carpet limestone pinnacles
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Badwater Salt Flats: (California, USA) This is the lowest point of the United States at -282 feet
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The Great Blue Hole: (Belize) A large submarine sinkhole which is over 984 feet across and 407 feet deep formed during several episodes of quaternary glaciation when sea levels were much lower.
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Hiller Lake: (Western Australia) Scientists cannot explain the pink colour although they have proven it is not due to the presence of algae | Read more on WhereCoolThingsHappen.com
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Balls Pyramid: (Lord Howe Island, New South Wales, Australia) The world’s tallest sea stack, at 562 metres formed through processes of coastal geomorphology, which are entirely natural. Time, wind, and water are the only factors involved
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Elephant Rock: ( Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA) A strange natural sandstone rock formation which looks like an elephant
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Crater Lake: (Oregon, USA) Formed about 150 years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama
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The Peculiar Pinnacles: (Nambung National Park, Western Australia) These amazing natural limestone structures, some standing as high as five metres, were formed approximately 25,000 to 30,000 years ago after the sea receded and left deposits of shells
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The sliding stones: (Death Valley, California, USA) The movement of the rocks continues to baffle experts who are at a loss to explain why they have moved across a perfectly flat bed despite weighing up to 700 pounds each
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The Moeraki Boulders: (New Zealand) The gigantic boulders started forming on the ocean floor and can now been seen sitting mysteriously on the coastline thanks to centuries of erosion
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The Beauty Pool: (Yellowstone National Park, USA) The hot spring allows luminous algae and bacteria to flourish creating a vivid array of colours.
Originally posted on: Where Cool Things Happen

35 comments:

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_Lake_%28Western_Australia%29

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    1. The photo is of Hiller lake, not Pink Lake (the wiki page you linked to is not an explanation of why some lakes are pink but an entry about a lake called Pink Lake).

      Lake Hillier, is a lake on Middle Island, the largest of the islands and islets that make up the Recherche Archipelago, Western Australia.

      The most notable feature of this lake is its pink colour. It is such a significant distinguishing feature of the archipelago that air passengers often take note of it. The colour is permanent, and does not alter when the water is taken in a container. The length of the lake is about six hundred metres. The lake is surrounded by a rim of sand and a dense woodland of paperbark and eucalyptus trees with a narrow strip of sand dunes covered by vegetation separating it to the north from the Southern Ocean.

      The island and lake are thought to have been first charted by the Flinders expedition in 1802. Captain Flinders is said to have observed the pink lake after ascending the island's peak. John Thistle, the ship's master, collected some of the lake's water, which he found to be saturated with salt.[2] Although the source of the pink colour has not been definitively proven in the case of Lake Hillier, the pink colour of other salt lakes (e.g., Pink Lake) in the region arises from a dye created by the organisms Dunaliella salina and Halobacteria. Another hypothesis is that the pink colour is due to red halophilic bacteria in the salt crusts.

      Despite the unusual hue, the lake exhibits no known adverse effects upon humans. From above the lake appears a solid bubble gum pink, but from the shoreline it looks more like a clear pink hue is in the water. The shoreline is also covered in salt crust deposits.

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  2. Correction on the sliding stones: When the clay/earth beneath them gets wet enough, it becomes very slick. High winds then can move the rocks. (Recent informational show.)

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    1. So how do you explain the 700 pounds of rock being moved by wind?

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    2. An object of any mass can be moved by any force if friction is low enough.

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    3. Gets wet enough? This is in Death Valley, where there is very little to no moisture or precipitation. What you stated isn't a fact. It is just one of many theories as to why the rocks move. It isn't just rocks either, one of my geology professor's put his backpack down, came back a few hours, and it had also moved like the boulders do. Some of these boulders are the size of houses.

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    4. Your professor definitely should have put up a camera

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    5. This theory has never been proven, because as you can see from the picture. the rocks move in different directions, sometimes, they go in straight lines and do a 90 degree turn, some travel in swerves then follow the pattern they came from, others stop moving and never move again. It is a mystery.

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    6. It's not a mystery, camera's have been set up and the whole 'mystery' was just a very normal very basic natural phenomenon, quite as explained above.. At night the temperature drops below zero and the winds move the rocks.. That they don't all move in straight lines is due to their size, weight and surface structure. Sorry to burst your bubble, but there's no invisible aliens that come out and play shuffleboard with these stones, it's plain physics. Just because we don't yet understand doesn't mean we have to shout 'miracle' and act like idiots, but I guess it goes to show the low standard of education these days.. Very sad.

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    7. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  3. Correction: Crater Lake was formed some 7,700 years ago during the catastrophic eruption of Mt. Mazama.

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  4. Hold on? Wind can move 700lb rocks? I don't think so

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    1. I think it is evident from recent events in Oklahoma that winds from a tornado can move a house, 2,000 pound car and even a 20,000 pound truck... So yes, a little 700 pound rock is no chore for the wind under the right conditions.

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    2. And this same wind that moves 700 lb rocks would leave the trails behind them perfectly untouched?

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    3. Gimme a break folks - yes, wind can move a 700 lb rock - but in the case of these moving rocks, it doesn't really have to... it is simple tectonics... If you've ever been there, you would see and know what is going on pretty much just by looking at the geology and knowing a little bit about CA plate tectonics. No wonder so many people believe in some superhero running the planet - what they cannot see and immediately describe must be attributed to the supernatural, right? Of course, an alternate route is to pursue education and study of such things, but then, who would actually have or take the time? Apparently not the people reading this and speculating with equally as ignorant readers.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m31EDrh5yvc

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  5. I didn't see the underwater (marine) brine lake. Another spectacular natural oddity. Check it out

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  6. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1hoiHvOeGc

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  7. Yes, wind can move 700 lb rocks across a slick surface. There has been time-lapse photography done of this.

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    1. LOL not true
      pure speculations

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  8. How do you explain rocks that were beside each other but moved to the opposite directions? Even if wind have done it. There is no way it can move those rocks even a hundred feet away from its point of origin. Woulda taken alooooot of time. Those were just one of the eplanations scientists could come up at that time. I saw a docu about this, but at the end of the day, they were still baffled of what really caused these rocks to move.

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    1. You are correct, these rocks & this phenomena still baffle scientists, and there is not a consensus as to what causes them, despite what the poster above said. I have a degree in geology, and we studied these rocks. The theory says that the clay soil gets wet and wind blows the rocks. However, this is Death Valley, not much precipitation, nor moisture there lol....it's the driest place in the US.

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    2. These rocks do not baffle scientists - just wannabes and amateurs. Water does play a part, but the simple answer lies here - it's tectonics and geology/geography, folks. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m31EDrh5yvc

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  9. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%90avolja_Varo%C5%A1

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  10. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1hoiHvOeGc Here's a video showing how water flows in from the mountains, water covers the ground, water freezes, wind + moving icy mud = rocks moving around.

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    1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m31EDrh5yvc - Nice try - but incorrect in and of itself - that water moves in UNDER ground - then plays a part with geology/tectonics that are clear and apparent in the area. Stop speculating, huh? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m31EDrh5yvc

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  11. scientists are full of shit... this is god's power. there is no scientifical explination for the sliding stones is it's not god's power.

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    1. I would say, "then you must be a scientist," but clearly that is not the case. You are an uneducated idiot with a keyboard who somehow as acquired the ability to type - not spell correctly, mind you - but type. #1, Explanation is a word that deserves to be spelled correctly - especially if you are using it to claim some sort of authority. Clearly you have none. #2, "god's power" would include simple, normal earth-related geology and tectonics - but then, since I would bet you're one of those folks who think the planet is 6,000 years old, an actual science lesson would be completely over your head. That probably explains why you were evidently kicked out of participating in the subject at school - uh, well, science and spelling were clearly off your schedule. Try THIS instead of your usual "too busy and stupid to actually find out" approach to life. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m31EDrh5yvc

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    2. Is is necessary to demean people when you think you have superior intelligence or education?

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    3. Sorry, I know I'm a bit late in commenting (I was moving 700 lb. rocks around and had to cover my tracks) but I agree with Judith Brown, none of this important enough (at this level) that someone should be 'shat upon' for expressing an opinion. Can't stay and chat, I have to go refill a pink ink cartridge at some oceanside lake ..... have a good one .... ;)

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    4. Not necessary, but I fully sympathize with Sharon's annoyance at the persistance in stupidity.. It's not even remotely about intelligence, it's about the ability to use reason, but these days most people can only echo what they see on the telly, no original thoughts and definitely neither ability nor incentive to work things out for themselves.

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  12. you have like umm how many different pinnacle rocks on this lol and you missed out the giants causeway ? seriously http://www.geographia.com/northern-ireland/ukiant01.htm

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  13. "Sandblasting wind continually helps to round the edges of exposed polygons. Annual precipitation is 3 to 4 inches (75 to 100 mm) and ice cover can be 1 to 2.5 inches (2.5 to 6.5 cm) thick. Typically only part of the playa will flood in any given year." - taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racetrack_Playa

    Case. Fucking. Closed.
    Can we move onto Bigfoot already?

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